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2012 Annual Meeting

You’re Invited!

Please join us on Thursday, September 27th from 8:30 – 10:30 AM for our 2011 Annual Meeting! Join us for a delicious breakfast and a celebration of our accomplishments throughout the year!


Keynote Speaker: Barbara Leverone

“The Amazing Infant Brain” Join Healthy Start Parenting Educator, and Sarasota Child’Space founder, Barbara Leverone, for a presentation about the fascinating capabilities, and incredible resilience of the infant brain, and what parents and educators can do to help facilitate healthy growth and development.

We will also be electing our 2012 – 2013 Executive Board, and presenting our 2012 Annual Awards! It is our tradition each year to recognize those in the community who have “gone above and beyond” to help us achieve our mission.

Please take a moment to fill out our on-line Annual Award Nomination Form.Your input is important to us!

For registration information, please scroll to the bottom of this page.
We are looking forward to seeing you, and we appreciate your support of our mission to improve the health and well-being of pregnant women, infants, and young children!

 

Event Information:


Thursday, September 27th, 2012
8:30 – 10:30 a.m.
Bent Tree Country Club
4700 Bent Tree Blvd. Sarasota, FL

Tickets:
General Tickets: $15, Patron Tickets: $50
Patrons will have the option of reserved seating and will be acknowledged in the event program.

Please RSVP and remit check by
September 16, 2011 to:
Healthy Start Coalition of Sarasota County
1750 17th Street, Building A
Sarasota, FL 34234

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Healthy Start Prenatal Risk Screen

What is Healthy Start Prenatal Risk Screening?


Every doctor in the state of Florida is required to offer a Healthy Start Screening to all pregnant women and their babies. By initialing “Yes” to being screening on the Healthy Start Prenatal  Risk Screen, women will know within minutes, if they or their baby have any potential health risks.

Healthy Start believes every woman deserves to know if she or her baby is at risk.


After completing the Healthy Start Screen, the doctor’s office or delivering facility will refer to Healthy Start based on answers provided on the Screening Form. Healthy Start and the doctor’s office continually communicate with each other to make sure the client has the best outcome possible.

What if I don’t need any help?


Even if you don’t have problems or the desire to use the Healthy Start services, completing the Healthy Start screen at your doctor or midwife’s office will be helpful in gathering the data and funding necessary to improve the system of care for ALL moms and babies in North Central Florida.


Click below to view a sample Healthy Start Prenatal Risk Screening form!


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Healthy Start Infant Risk Screen

What is Healthy Start Screening?


Every doctor in the state of Florida is required to offer a Healthy Start Screening to all pregnant women and their babies. By initialing “Yes” to being screened on the Healthy Start Infant Risk Screen, women will know within minutes, if  their baby has any potential health risks.

Healthy Start believes every woman deserves to know if she or her baby is at risk.


After completing the Healthy Start Screen, the doctor’s office or delivering facility will refer to Healthy Start based on answers provided on the Screening Form. Healthy Start and the doctor’s office continually communicate with each other to make sure the client has the best outcome possible.

What if I don’t need any help?


Even if you don’t have problems or the desire to use the Healthy Start services, completing the Healthy Start screen at your birthing facility will be helpful in gathering the data and funding necessary to improve the system of care for ALL moms and babies in Sarasota County.


Click below to view a sample Healthy Start Infant Screening form!


 

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Community Support

The Healthy Start Coalition is grateful to our  generous community sponsors and partners for continued support in our efforts to improve the health and well-being of pregnant women, infants, and young children in Sarasota County.

In the face of severe, state-wide budget cuts, the Healthy Start Coalition relies on outside support now more than ever.  Without our donors and sponsors, we would be severely limited in our capacity to support pregnant women and infants in Sarasota County.

Thank you for your support!


Donors:


Shara Abrams
George Alberici
Ann Babcock
Richard R. Babcock
Cari Beard
Monica Becket
Ruby Bell
Mary Anne Bowie
Ned Bowman
Bill Cannady
Jeff Cheng
Kitty Cranor
Carol Donnelly
Dolores Dunn
Michael Feiertag
Keith Fitzgerald
John Flaherty
Ellen Fontana
Michelle Giambra
Joe Gonzales
Gregory Paul Hanes
Meghan Connolly Hanes
Michael and Mary Jane Hartenstine
Dr. Washington Hill
Cameron Icard
James Johnson
Deborah Kaufman
Philip King
Kelly Kirschner
Jeffrey and Susan Kral
David Kramer
Philip Lonzen
Commissioner Carolyn Mason
Cathy Matthews
Mike McIntosh
Sue Moreland
Jenna Norwood
Laurel Phipps
Ron Reagan
Shelley Rence
Chip Schaaff
John and Valerie Schaub
Leland Selvey
Carol Selvey
Kathryn Shea
Nancy Shoemaker
Linda Spivey
Linda Stone
Diane Taylor
Patti Treubert
Ann Voorhees
Erika D. Wagner
Timothy and Kim Williams
Deborah and Joseph Yohn


Foundations:


Organizations:


Local Businesses:


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Parenting Support

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Healthy Start Smoking Cessation Services

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Education for Healthcare Providers

The Healthy Start Coalition periodically offers Professional Education to Maternal-Child Health care providers on a variety of topics.

When funding is available, Healthy Start provides in-office trainings and seminars to update Health Professionals on relevant topics such as Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome, Prescription Drug Use during Pregnancy, Breastfeeding, Smoking Cessation, and more.

 

Education and CME’s


Expanding Pediatricians’ Roles in Breastfeeding Support: Continuing Medical Education (CME) Online Tutorial

As more mothers choose to breastfeed, health care professionals are in a unique position to provide the instruction, encouragement and support that mothers and their infants need to be successful. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) updated its policy statement on breastfeeding in 2012. Efforts to help pediatric residents support mothers led to the creation of the AAP’s Breastfeeding Residency Curriculum. This CME is designed to provide you with a refresher course on breastfeeding. It has a practical orientation with a focus on support for mothers after discharge from the hospital.

Pediatricians can make important contributions to the promotion of breastfeeding through encouragement, recommendations, and role modeling. Support and counseling by health professionals has been shown to improve rates, early initiation and total duration of breastfeeding, particularly exclusive breastfeeding. Mothers’ decisions are influenced greatly by health professionals’ advice. Mothers may have many different sources of information on breastfeeding coming to them from family, friends, and advertising campaigns, but the most reliable information should be coming from their pediatricians. With their highly visible role in the community and their frequent, continuous interactions with soon-to-be and new parents, pediatricians can be a key component in the promotion and support of breastfeeding, especially in the early days post-partum. A mother may face many challenges that may affect her breastfeeding outcomes in the long run; in those early days, the pediatrician is the person she will rely on for help and answers to her questions.

This 1.5 hour online continuing education tutorial is designed to meet the educational needs of practicing pediatricians and other pediatric primary care providers.
Available here: http://www.northeastern.edu/breastfeedingcme/


Webinar: Opportunities in Health Reform to Prevent Infant Death

“Opportunities in Health Reform to Prevent Infant Death” is now available online from the National Sudden Unexpected Infant-Child and Pregnancy Loss Resource Center. The September 2010 webinar, co-sponsored by the Association of SIDS and Infant Mortality Professionals (ASIP) and the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs (AMCHP), covers 1) opportunities for maternal and child health under health reform legislation, 2) promoting preconception and interconception health through improved insurance coverage and benefits, 3) optimizing home visiting program investments and 4) leveraging investments from the Prevention and Public Health Fund.


Core Competencies in Breastfeeding Care and Services

The US Breastfeeding Committee (USBC) has announced the publication of the revised “Core Competencies in Breastfeeding Care and Services for All Health Professionals.”  The purpose of the Competencies is to provide health care organizations with a guideline and framework to integrate evidence-based breastfeeding knowledge, skills and attitudes into standard health care delivery practice.  The USBC notes that, at a minimum, every health professional should understand the role of lactation, human milk and breastfeeding in the optimal feeding of infants and young children and enhancing and reducing morbidities in women and long-term morbidities in infants and young children.  In addition, all health professionals should be able to facilitate the breastfeeding care process by:  preparing families for realistic expectations; communicating pertinent information to the lactation care team; and following up with the family when appropriate, in a culturally competent manner after breastfeeding care and services have been provided.  The document can be downloaded HERE.


Bringing Immunity To Every Community

Every Child By Two (ECBT) and the American Nurses Association (ANA) have announced the availability of a new, dynamic online continuing education course.  “Bringing Immunity to Every Community” is aimed at increasing immunization competency among nurses by offering practical knowledge and skills on vaccine safety and patient communication.  Highlights include a discussion of the scientific findings regarding the safety of vaccines; systems in place to ensure the ongoing safety of vaccines and adverse event reporting requirements; methods to eliminate the spread of vaccine-preventable diseases, such as influenza and pertussis; and the critical role of vaccination of adults and, in particular, healthcare workers to reduce the spread of deadly diseases.  The course features several video dramatizations where nurses take part in a dialogue with friends, co-workers and parents, providing real-life scenarios that will aid participants as they interact with individuals with concerns about vaccine effectiveness and safety.  The course is available for free and provides 2.5 contact hours.  To view and/or take the online course, go to http://www.yourcesource.com/ecbt/.

 

Reports, Research, and Tool-kits


The Transfer of Drugs and Therapeutics Into Human Breast Milk: An Update on Selected Topics

Many mothers are inappropriately advised to discontinue breastfeeding or avoid taking essential medications because of fears of adverse effects on their infants. This cautious approach may be unnecessary in many cases, because only a small proportion of medications are contraindicated in breastfeeding mothers or associated with adverse effects on their infants. Information to inform physicians about the extent of excretion for a particular drug into human milk is needed but may not be available. Previous statements on this topic from the American Academy of Pediatrics provided physicians with data concerning the known excretion of specific medications into breast milk. More current and comprehensive information is now available on the Internet, as well as an application for mobile devices, at LactMed (http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov). Therefore, with the exception of radioactive compounds requiring temporary cessation of breastfeeding, the reader will be referred to LactMed to obtain the most current data on an individual medication. This report discusses several topics of interest surrounding lactation, such as the use of psychotropic therapies, drugs to treat substance abuse, narcotics, galactagogues, and herbal products, as well as immunization of breastfeeding women. A discussion regarding the global implications of maternal medications and lactation in the developing world is beyond the scope of this report. The World Health Organization offers several programs and resources that address the importance of breastfeeding (seehttp://www.who.int/topics/breastfeeding/en/).

Abstract available at: http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2013/08/20/peds.2013-1985.abstract


Culturally Competent Resources through MCH Library of Georgetown University

The Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Library at Georgetown University has updated its Culturally Competent Services Resource Brief, a guide to Web sites and related professional resources.  The Brief contains links to federal agency and other organizational Web sites, along with descriptions of selected resources.  Also featured are selected resources developed by the MCH Library including an annotated bibliography on culturally competent services, links to minority health organizations and non-English-language materials and resources, and a knowledge path on racial and ethnic disparities in health.  The brief is available at Maternal and Child Health Culturally Competent Resources


Impact of Maternal Flu Vaccination on Infant Hospitalization

A study published December 15th in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases found that influenza (flu) vaccine given to pregnant women reduces hospitalization due to the disease in their infants.  Although infants aged less than 12 months are at a high risk of hospitalization for flu, there is no flu vaccine approved for infants under six months of age.  Researchers conducted a matched case-control study of infants aged less than 12 months who were admitted to a large urban hospital in the northeastern US due to laboratory-confirmed influenza during 2000-2009.  For each case, one or two control subjects were enrolled (infants who tested negative for flu) and cases were matched by date of birth and date of hospitalization. The flu vaccine was found to be 91.5% effective in preventing hospitalization among infants when given to their mothers during pregnancy.  To review the study online, CLICK HERE.


Second Hand Smoke and Exposure in Children

A study published online December 13th in the journal Pediatrics examines the level of secondhand tobacco-smoke exposure in children who live in multi-unit housing (particularly apartments).  Even low levels of exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke can put children at greater risk for a variety of illnesses.  The study authors analyzed data from the 2001-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and compared tobacco-smoke biomarkers in children ages 6-18 who lived in detached houses (including mobile homes), attached houses, and apartments.  Of 5,002 children who lived in a home where no one smoked inside, blood levels of cotinine (a common marker of tobacco smoke exposure) were higher in those who lived in apartments, in comparison with children in other types of housing.  Children living in apartments had an increase in cotinine of 45% over those living in detached houses, with the increase at 212% for white residents and 46% for black residents (and no significant increase for those of other races/ethnicities).  The study authors concluded that the tobacco smoke may have seeped through walls or shared ventilation systems, and that smoking bans in multi-unit housing may reduce children’s exposure to tobacco smoke. Access the study online – click here.


AAP Fact Sheets on Health Reform

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has created several one-page fact sheets to explain key provisions in the health reform law, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PL 111-148) and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (PL 111-152), and how they will impact children and pediatricians.  The AAP Web site notes that the organization’s priorities for health reform have been addressed in the law. These include:  health care coverage for all children in the US; age-appropriate benefits in a medical home; and appropriate payment rates and workforce improvements to allow real access to covered services.  Access the fact sheets at http://aap.org/advocacy/washing/mainpage.htm

Healthy-Start-Program-LogoHealthy Start Screening Tutorials


Prenatal Risk Screen Tutorial 

This tutorial provides basic information about the Healthy Start Coalition, the Healthy Start Program, prenatal eligibility, how to refer clients to Healthy Start, and instructions on how to fill out and score the Prenatal Risk Screen.

Infant Risk Screen Tutorial

This tutorial provides basic information about the Healthy Start Coalition, the Healthy Start Program, infant eligibility, how to refer clients to Healthy Start, and instructions on how to fill out and score the Infant Risk Screen.

If you have any questions about eligibility, referrals, or screening or you would like a to arrange a free training in your office, please contact Jamee Thumm at 941-373-7070 ext 307.

 

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Infant Risk Screen

What is the Healthy Start Infant Risk Screen?


Click here for an interactive tutorial

Florida’s Healthy Start Infant Risk Screening Instrument is a simple, brief questionnaire that helps the birthing facility identify infants who are at increased risk of post-neonatal or infant mortality during the first year of life or at risk for adverse health and developmental outcomes.

Infants with a score of 4 or more are approximately 6 times more likely to die within the first year after birth! So, early intervention is key.

Who has to be Screened?


Florida State Statute, 383.14 (FAC 64-C), written in 1991, states that the Healthy Start Infant Risk Screen is offered to parents or guardians of all infants born in Florida before leaving the delivering facility. In other words, it’s the law!

What is the Birthing Facility’s Role?


  1. Make sure the parent or guardian is offered the confidential Infant Risk Screening. Approach the screening in a positive manner and be available to answer questions and correct any misinformation about Healthy Start. Give the patient the brochure entitled, “Healthy Start Infant Risk Screening” (available in English and Spanish). Encourage every parent or guardian to consent to the screening questions (though screening is voluntary). Completion of the questions helps assure that infants at risk receive the services they need, and provides for a strong data base for the county and state of Florida that can be used in enhancing maternal and child services. Completion of these questions also helps bring in additional funding to Sarasota County for services. Consent for the screening must be documented 1) on the Birth Certificate in the upper left hand corner, and 2) in the appropriate blanks on the Infant Risk Screen form. If consent is refused, it still must be documented on those two forms.
    In either case, the mother’s and infant’s data at the top of the form and the “Check One” section at the end of the form must be completed legibly, and then the form must be signed and dated by the provider. Please fill in every blank or box in those sections.
  2. Instructions for completing and scoring the screen are on the back pages of the screening form. Please note that “Hispanic” is not a race (it is an ethnicity) and does not affect the answer to Item 30 on the Birth Certificate, “Mother’s race is unknown, other than white, or multiple races selected.”
  3. Encourage every new mother to participate in Healthy Start when the answers indicate the infant is at high risk (a score of 4 or more). Healthy Start services are not income based; research shows that risks can span all income levels. Give them Sarasota County’s Healthy Start Coalition brochure which lists our services.
  4. If the infant does not score a four or more, yet you have concerns about domestic violence, substance abuse, history of abuse or neglect, lack of basic needs, etc., you can make a referral to Healthy Start for reason other than score, with the parent/guardian’s permission. “Patient Desires” or “participated during pregnancy” are not reasons for referral in the absence of the named risk factors.
  5. A parent or guardian can also request Healthy Start services if the score is less than four by calling 861-2905.
  6. After discussing the findings with the parent or guardian, give them the green copy, put the pink copy on the chart, and along with the birth certificate send the white and yellow copies of the screen within 5 days to: Sarasota County Health Department, P.O. Box 2658, Sarasota, FL, 34230. If Birthtype ® is used, you will need to photocopy three additional sheets and have the patient sign each, then distribute according to the color code. If the parent or guardian has answered the questions and agreed to participate, she will be contacted by the Healthy Start Program and offered services based on her level of risk.

What Does “High-Risk” Mean?


“High Risk” means there are environmental or medical risk factors, including physical, social or economic factors, in the baby’s life that increases the risk of death in the first year, or contribute to poor health and development.

Risk factors for infants include: maternal age less than 18; maternal age over 18 but education is less than 12th grade; mother race is other than white, unknown, or multiple races; mother is not married; the number of prenatal visits is zero, one, or unknown; infant weighs less than 2000 Gms; mother used tobacco or alcohol during pregnancy; or the infant has an abnormal condition or congenital anomaly.

What are Healthy Start Services?


Healthy Start services are free to Healthy Start clients or their parents. Services provided by Healthy Start Care Coordinators (who are nurses or social workers) include care coordination, home visiting, and referrals to wraparound services such as: psychosocial counseling, smoking cessation programs, breastfeeding education, nutrition counseling and parenting education. Referrals are also made to appropriate agencies for food, clothing, baby items, etc.

What is the Difference between the Healthy Start Coalition and the Healthy Start Program?


The Healthy Start Coalition of Sarasota County is a non-profit organization which helps set priorities to meet local needs in maternal and infant health. Members of the community are invited to serve on the Coalition or any of its committees. The Coalition also administers all service contracts. Our phone number is 941-373-7070.

The Healthy Start Program of the Sarasota County Health Department is our sub-contractor for Care Coordination services and data entry. Care Coordination is the key to service provision for Healthy Start clients. A highly qualified staff assures that each client’s needs are addressed. The Healthy Start Program phone number 941-861-2905.

How Can the Healthy Start Coalition Help Me?


The Healthy Start Coalition of Sarasota County provides technical assistance and monitors quality on an ongoing basis. Any time you have a question or need to train a new employee, call the Coalition at 373-7070. During visits to your site, Coalition staff will also share with you screening data.


Infant Screen Tutorial

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Prenatal Risk Screening

What is the Healthy Start Prenatal Risk Screen?


Click here for an interactive tutorial

Florida’s Healthy Start Prenatal Risk Screening Instrument is a simple, brief questionnaire that helps identify factors in a pregnant woman’s life and medical and psychosocial factors that might lead to poor pregnancy outcomes such as low birth weight, premature birth, fetal/infant death, or developmental delays of the child.

Who has to be screened?


Florida State Statute, 383.14 (FAC 64-C) states “The health care provider delivering prenatal services shall assure that a prenatal risk screening instrument is completed and risk status is determined at every pregnant woman’s initial visit.”

What is the Health Care Provider’s Role?


  1. Make sure every pregnant woman is offered the confidential Prenatal Risk Screen. Approach the screening in a positive manner and be available to answer questions and correct any misinformation about Healthy Start she may have. The top and bottom portions of the record must be completed. Give the patient the brochure entitled, “Healthy Start Prenatal Risk Screening” (available in English and Spanish).
  2. Encourage every pregnant woman to consent to and answer the screening questions.  This is voluntary.  Completion of the questions provides the prenatal care provider with excellent information that will help tailor prenatal care. It assesses potential risks which may allow a woman to have Healthy Start services.  Completion of these questions also helps bring in additional funding to Sarasota County for services, whether or not a referral to Healthy Start occurs.
  3. Encourage every pregnant woman or new mother to participate in Healthy Start when her answers indicate she is at high risk (a score of 6 or more) or when you think she could benefit from Healthy Start services (please see list of eligibility requirements for referral to Healthy Start in next section). Healthy Start services are for pregnant women who are at risk for an unhealthy pregnancy or baby. Healthy Start services are not income based. Healthy Start is not a government program. Healthy Start has no affiliation with Department of Children and Families (DCF).

How Do I Fill in and Score the Screen?


Instructions for completing and scoring the screen are listed on the back pages of the screening form:  the white page explains how to complete the screen, the pink page explains how to score.

Send the screen to the Sarasota County Health Department within 5 days regardless of whether the woman has consented to answer the questions or agreed to participate in Healthy Start.  If the woman has answered the questions and agreed to participate, she will be contacted by the Healthy Start Program and offered services based on her level of risk. Please do not wait for an ultrasound test to determine EDD. Use Nägeles Method.

What do I do with the form when it’s completed?


First, take the opportunity to discuss the findings with the patient. At this time, the Healthy Start Program in Sarasota County is accepting referrals ONLY for a score of 6 or presence of at least one risk factor listed in the section below. Explain to her how she and the baby can benefit from the services.

Give the patient the green copy, put the pink copy on the chart, and send the white and yellow copies within 5 days to: Sarasota County Health Department, Healthy Start Program, P.O. Box 2658 – Sarasota, FL 34230 .

(If at anytime during the pregnancy risk factors emerge, a referral can be made to Healthy Start by calling 861-2905. A DOH Referral Form can also be used.)

What Does “High-Risk” Mean?


Risk factors include physical, social or medical factors in an individual’s life that increase risk for having or developing a health or health-related problem. Risk factors on the prenatal screen are proven by research to increase risks for poor birth outcomes.

Risk factors on the screen include: age, race, marital status, education, weight,   domestic violence, sexual abuse,  tobacco or  alcohol use, unwanted pregnancy, first pregnancy, previous pregnancy problems or loss of baby, maternal illness, and late entry into prenatal care.  A score on the screen of 6 or more indicates the pregnant woman is at risk for a poor birth outcome, and is automatically referred to Healthy Start with her consent.

The Healthy Start Program in Sarasota County will also accept women with a score less than 6 if any one of these risk factors is present:

  1. Prior fetal or infant loss
  2. Complicated medical conditions impacting pregnancy, including HIV+, Hepatitis B+, thyroid or cardiac diseases, hypertension, diabetes, etc.
  3. Current substance use – tobacco, drugs, or alcohol.
  4. Severe depression, active mental illness, or post-partum depression.
  5. Need breastfeeding classes or post-partum breastfeeding support.
  6. Current abuse or neglect in the home.
  7. Homelessness

What are Healthy Start Services?


Healthy Start services include care coordination and referrals for wraparound services for pregnant women and parents of children up to the age of three, such as pre/interconception education, psychosocial counseling, smoking cessation programs, childbirth education, breastfeeding education and support, nutrition counseling, and parenting education. Referrals are also made to appropriate agencies for food, clothing, baby items, etc.

Will the Healthy Start Program Contact me about the Patient?


The Healthy Start Care Coordinator for your patient will send you a letter with information about the client’s acceptance or refusal of the program.  The Care Coordinator may also call you if she is concerned about the client’s attendance at prenatal care appointments or is having difficulty locating the client. This personal health information sharing is allowed under HIPAA.  The Care Coordinator will call you if she has any other concerns.

What is the Difference between the Healthy Start Coalition and the Healthy Start Program?


The Healthy Start Coalition of Sarasota County is a non-profit organization which helps set priorities to meet local needs in maternal and infant health.  Members of the community are invited to serve on the Coalition or any of its committees.  Our phone number is 941-373-7070.

The Healthy Start Program of the Sarasota County Health Department is our sub-contractor for Care Coordination services and data management. Care Coordination is the key to service provision for Healthy Start clients.  A highly qualified staff of Registered Nurses, Licensed Clinical Social Workers, and Family Support Workers assure that each client’s needs are addressed. The Healthy Start Program phone number 941-861-2905.

How can the Healthy Start Coalition Help Me?


The Healthy Start Coalition of Sarasota County provides technical assistance and monitors quality on an ongoing basis. Any time you have a question or need to train a new employee, call the Coalition at 373-7070.


Prenatal Screen Tutorial

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Nutrition

Eating Healthy During Pregnancy


During pregnancy, you can eat the same things that you normally eat when you were not pregnant. But especially in the first few months of your pregnancy, your baby can be hurt by poisons (toxins) or germs (bacteria).

For this reason, you need to be aware of these food dangers and learn how to choose and prepare your food safely.

What Foods Might Be Harmful to My Baby During Pregnancy?


The foods of most concern are fish, meat, milk, and cheese. Because these are important parts of most diets, you will want to learn to choose the right fish, meat, milk, or cheese.

What’s the Problem With Fish?


Many fish – especially fish that are large, eat other fish, and live a long time – have mercury in them. Mercury can cause problems with the development of your baby’s brain and nerves. Fish may also have dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). These toxins may cause problems with the development of your baby’s brain and may cause cancer.

So Should I Just Stop Eating Fish?


No. Fish is a wonderful food. It has lots of good protein and other nutrients. You can continue to eat fish, but you may wish to cut down on the amount of fish you eat and change the kind of fish you eat.

What Meat is Dangerous?


In the United States most of our meat is safe to eat. However, meat that has not been kept cold or that has not been prepared properly may have germs or parasites that could harm you or your baby. Raw meat may contain toxoplasmosis. Toxoplasmosis is a germ that can damage your growing baby’s eyes, brain, and hearing.

What Do I Need to Know About Milk And Cheese?


Some cheese may contain germs (bacteria) called listeria. These germs can cause a disease called listeriosis, which may cause miscarriage, stillbirth, or serious health problems for your baby. To avoid listeriosis, you may want to avoid soft cheeses like Mexican-style queso blanco fresco, feta, or Brie.

How Do I Prepare Food Safely?


  • Wash your hands and cooking surfaces often.
  • Keep raw meat away from raw fruit and vegetables and cooked meat.
  • Cook your food until it is steaming hot. Keep uneaten food cold or frozen.

 

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FIMR Case Review Team (CRT)

The FIMR Case Review Team  (CRT) examines fetal and infant deaths in order to achieve a better future for all children and families. Each case reviewed provides us with an opportunity to look more broadly at community and system circumstances. The CRT process includes:

  • Data abstraction from hospital, medical and vital records by a nurse/medical records abstractor.
  • Maternal interview.
  • De-identified fetal and infant death case review.

Sources of data may include vital records data, prenatal, delivery, neonatal and pediatric records, autopsy medical records, physician and hospital records along with those from home visits, Healthy Start, WIC and, additional social service records when available.

The role of the CRT is to determine whether:


  • The family received the services they needed?
  • Are there gaps in the system?
  • What can this case tell us about how families can best utilize existing local resources?

CRT members include a broad range of medicine and health professionals, organizations and public and private agencies (health, welfare, education and social services), consumers and maternal child health advocates.

The Case Review Team:


  • reviews the case summaries to identify barriers to care, gaps in services, trends in service delivery and availability of community resources for families.
  • documents what opportunities for improvement exist.
  • reports their findings to the community action team.

2012 Meeting Dates:


Thursdays, 12:00-2:00 pm,
Sarasota Memorial Hospital, Waldemere Medical Center – Magnolia Room
January 12, February 19, March 8, April 12, May 10, June 14, July 12, August 9, September 13, October 11, November 8, December 6

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2010 Annual Report

2010 Annual Report

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Do you Text4Baby?

Text “Baby” to 511411!


If you’re pregnant or a new mom, there is new free service called text4baby that can help keep you and your baby healthy.

Text4baby will send 3 text messages each week to your cell phone with expert health tips to help you through your pregnancy and your baby’s first year.  It’s free to sign up and the messages are free.

How do I sign up?


Sign up for the service by texting BABY to 511411 (or BEBE in Spanish) to receive free SMS text messages each week, timed to your due date or baby’s date of birth.

What topics do the messages cover?


  • birth defects prevention
  • breastfeeding
  • car seat safety
  • developmental milestones
  • drugs and alcohol
  • emotional well being
  • exercise and fitness
  • immunizations
  • labor and delivery
  • mental health
  • nutrition
  • safe sleep
  • stop smoking, and more!

How long do I have to subscribe?


Get the messages throughout your pregnancy and up to the baby’s first year of life. You can stop receiving text messages anytime by simply texting

STOP to 511411.

Am I charged for the text messages?


All messages you receive from text4baby are completely free!

 

Learn more about Text4Baby


You can also sign up and find more at text4baby.org.

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Quit-Smoking Support

Before a child enters your world,

remove tobacco from your life.


Pregnancy is a wonderful time of your life. It’s the first chance you have to influence the life and health of the child you are about to bring into the world.

Unfortunately, using tobacco can cause serious problems for your unborn baby. With every puff of a cigarette, a pregnant woman exposed her baby to over 2,000 harmful chemicals.

Women who smoke during pregnancy are more likely to have:


  • An ectopic pregnancy
  • Vaginal bleeding
  • Placental abruption (placenta peels away, partially or almost completely, from the uterine wall before delivery)
  • Placenta previa (a low-lying placenta that covers part or all of the opening of the uterus
  • A stillbirth

Babies born to women who smoke during pregnancy are more likely to be born:


  • With birth defects such as cleft lip or palate
  • Prematurely
  • At low birthweight
  • Underweight for the number of weeks of pregnancy

Babies born prematurely and at low birthweight are at risk of other serious health problems, including lifelong disabilities (such as cerebral palsy, mental retardation and learning problems), and in some cases, death.

Healthy Start is here to help you quit.


You have the power to change your habit, and give your child the gift of good health. Healthy Start can connect you with free services to help you quit smoking!

  • Hypnosis – Hypnosis helps you to gain the strength to stop smoking and stay that way. It teaches you o focus and strengthen your mind, ad also helps you to relax deeply and reduce stress.
  • Counseling – Reduce your stress through private sessions with a licensed mental health counselor. Healthy Start can refer you o a counselor who will listen to you and support you in becoming and staying smoke-free.
  • Florida QuitLine – The Florida QuitLine can help provide free counseling and nicotine replacement aids like patches, lozenges, an gum. Call 1-877-U-CAN-NOW or visit www.FloridaQuitline.com

We know it’s hard to quit smoking – Let us help you make it easier.


Call 941-861-2905 to contact the Healthy Start Program today!


 

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Resources for Pregnant Women

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Educational Outreach

We provide education to the community and maternal-child health care providers on a number of issues.

These include breastfeeding, smoking cessation, interconception health, oral health in pregnancies, and other topics related to prenatal and infant health.

Community education is offered in many ways:


  • Educational programs for maternal-child health professionals are offered in workshops or small-class formats. For prenatal and pediatric care providers, programs can be tailored to be held within the office setting. Continuing education hours are usually awarded for participation in our programs.
  • Professional speakers are available to give presentations at service clubs, places of worship, small businesses, or volunteer organizations.
  • Our Community Health Worker Program sends peer trainers to small places to give short educational programs. These can be given to groups of friends, families, co-employees, church members, and others. This program is based on availability of grant money.
  • Our Pregnancy Resource Center, at 1750 17th Street, Building A, in Sarasota, has a variety of educational brochures on topics related to pre-pregnancy and pregnancy health; childbirth; breastfeeding; infant care; and parenting. There are also two computers that have leading websites for good information. Hours are 8:30 am – 5 pm on a drop-in basis. For special arrangements at another time, call us at 373-7070, extension 300.
  • The annual Community Baby Shower held each May hosts many agencies who work with pregnant women, infants, young children, or parents. It’s an excellent place to get a lot of free information on different topics.
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Community Health Workers

Community Health Workers (CHWs) are members of a particular community who are trained in a specific health topic.  After they are trained, they share that knowledge with their friends, co-workers, church, family, etc.

This program is successful because CHWs already have relationships with the people that they are teaching, and can make a positive  impact community health on a grassroots level.

Community Health Worker  Programs:


Tobacco Prevention and Cessation


Community Health Workers educate the Community about the harmful effects of Smoking and using tobacco products, particularly during pregnancy. Community Health Workers present interactive demonstrations, and provide referrals to local free quit-smoking resources.

This Program was sponsored by Gulfcoast South Area Health Education Center.

Do You Need a Tune Up Before Pregnancy?
Tune Up Your Health, that is!


Community Health Workers give presentations on pre- and interconception health.  This presentation focuses on preparing physically, emotionally and financially before becoming pregnant.

This program was funded by the Gulfcoast South Area Health Education Center.

Clean Start Initiative


Clean Start is a substance free pregnancy program.  Community Health Workers give presentations on how to have a healthy pregnancy and the effects of tobacco, alcohol and drugs during pregnancy.

This program was funded by the Gulfcoast South Area Health Education Center.

Start Motherhood with a Healthy Mouth


“Start Motherhood with a Healthy Mouth” provided education to Pregnant Women, New moms, and women of childbearing age on the importance of good dental hygeine before and during pregnancy.

This program was funded by the Gulfcoast South Area Health Education Center.

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Special Report: C-Sections

 

 

C-section

  • A cesarean section is the birth of a baby by surgery.
  • You may need a c-section if you or baby’s health is at risk.
  • Recovery from a c-section is longer than a vaginal birth.

C-section: Medical reasons

Cesarean birth is the birth of a baby by surgery. The doctor makes an incision (cut) in the belly and uterus (womb) and then removes the baby. The surgery is called a cesarean section or c-section. The natural way for a baby to be born is through the mother’s vagina (birth canal). But sometimes vaginal birth isn’t possible. If you or your baby have certain problems before or during labor, c-section may be safer than vaginal birth.

You and your health care provider may plan your cesarean in advance. Or you may need an emergency (unplanned) c-section because of a complication that arises for you or your baby during pregnancy or labor.

Why might I have a c-section?
Your health care provider may suggest that you have a c-section for one or more of these reasons:

  • You’ve already had a c-section in another pregnancy or other surgeries on your uterus.
  • Your baby is too big to pass safely through the vagina.
  • The baby’s buttocks or feet enter the birth canal first, instead of the head. This is called a breech position.
  • The baby’s shoulder enters the birth canal first, instead of the head. This is called a transverse position.
  • There are problems with the placenta. This is the organ that nourishes your baby in the womb. Placental problems can cause dangerous bleeding during vaginal birth.
  • Labor is too slow or stops.
  • The baby’s umbilical cord slips into the vagina, where it could be squeezed or flattened during vaginal delivery. This is called umbilical cord prolapse.
  • You have an infection like HIV or genital herpes.
  • You’re having twins, triplets or more.
  • The baby has problems during labor that show it is under stress, such as a slow heart rate. This is sometimes called “fetal distress.”
  • You have a serious medical condition that requires intensive or emergency treatment (such as diabetes or high blood pressure).
  • The baby has a certain type of birth defect.

A woman who has a c-section usually takes longer to recover than a woman who has had a vaginal birth. Women can expect to stay 3 to 4 days in the hospital after a c-section. Full recovery usually takes 4 to 6 weeks. Usually, the hospital stay for vaginal birth is 2 days, with full recovery taking less time than a cesarean. C-section may be more expensive than a vaginal birth.

What about the risks?
When c-sections are done, most women and babies do well. But c-section is a major operation with risks from the surgery itself and from anesthesia.

The National Center for Health Statistics estimates that 1 in 3 babies in the United States are delivered by c-section. Over the past few years, the rate of cesarean birth has increased rapidly. Some health care providers believe that many c-sections are medically unnecessary. When a woman has a cesarean, the benefits of the procedure should outweigh the risks.

The risk of late preterm birth
C-sections may contribute to the growing number of babies who are born “late preterm,” between 34 and 36 weeks gestation. While babies born at this time are usually considered healthy, they are more likely to have medical problems than babies born a few weeks later at full term.

A baby’s lungs and brain mature late in pregnancy. Compared to a full-term baby, an infant born between 34 and 36 weeks gestation is more likely to have problems with:

  • Breathing
  • Feeding
  • Maintaining his or her temperature
  • JaundiceÂ

It can be hard to pinpoint the date your baby was conceived. Being off by just a week or two can result in a premature birth. This may make a difference in your baby’s health. Keep this in mind when scheduling a c-section.

Other risks for the baby

  • Anesthesia: Some babies are affected by the drugs given to the mother for anesthesia during surgery. These medications make the woman numb so she can’t feel pain. But they may cause the baby to be inactive or sluggish.
  • Breathing problems: Even if they are full-term, babies born by c-section are more likely to have breathing problems than are babies who are delivered vaginally.

Breastfeeding
Women who have c-sections are less likely to breastfeed than women who have vaginal deliveries. This may be because they are uncomfortable from the surgery or have less time with the baby in the hospital. If you are planning to have a cesarean section and want to breastfeed, talk to your provider about what can be done to help you and your baby start breastfeeding as soon as you can.

Risks for the mother
A few women have one or more of these complications after a c-section:

  • Increased bleeding, which may require a blood transfusion
  • Infection in the incision, in the uterus, or in other nearby organs
  • Reactions to medications, including the drugs used for anesthesia
  • Injuries to the bladder or bowel
  • Blood clots in the legs, pelvic organs or lungs

A very small number of women who have c-sections die. Death is rare, but it is more likely with cesarean than with vaginal delivery.

If a woman who has had a cesarean section becomes pregnant again, she is at increased risk of:

  • Placenta previa: The placenta implants very low in the uterus. It covers all or part of the internal opening of the cervix (the birth canal).
  • Placenta accreta: The placenta implants too deeply and too firmly into the uterine wall.

Both of these conditions can lead to severe bleeding during labor and delivery, endangering mother and baby. The risk increases with the number of pregnancies.

Making decisions
Every pregnancy is different. If you are considering a planned c-section for medical reasons or are interested in asking that your baby be delivered by c-section, talk with the health care provider who will deliver your baby. Carefully consider the risks and benefits for your baby and yourself. These questions may be useful when you speak to your provider.

If your provider recommends delivery before 39 weeks:

  • Is there a problem with my health or the health of my baby that may make me need to have my baby early?
  • Can I wait to have my baby closer to 40 weeks?

About c-section:

  • Why do I need to have a c-section?
  • What problems can a c-section cause for me and my baby?
  • Will I need to have a c-section in future pregnancies?

July 2008

© 2010 March of Dimes Foundation. The March of Dimes is a non-profit organization recognized as tax-exempt under Internal Revenue Code section 501(c)(3).

http://www.marchofdimes.com/printableArticles/csection_indepth.html

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Your Community Liason

Jamee Thumm,  Community Liaison for Sarasota County

Jamee Thumm, Community Liaison for Sarasota County

Florida Statute §383.14 mandates that all prenatal care providers offer the Healthy Start Prenatal Screen at the first prenatal visit, and that all birthing facilities offer the Healthy Start Infant Screen after birth. It is the Coalition’s responsibility to inform health care providers of this responsibility and teach them how to complete the screen correctly.

Your Maternal-Child Healthcare Provider Liaison is responsible and available to provide training to you and your staff. The Liaison will also help troubleshoot screening issues and problems and keep you informed of your screening rates and errors. Regular visits are scheduled, but we know that there are often staff turnovers between visits, which cause loss of knowledge and information regarding the screening process.

Please call the Healthy Start Office at  (941) 373-7073 to arrange training in your office. We are more than happy to assist you!

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Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding gives your baby the most healthy start in life.  Breastfeeding also offers a very special time for you and your baby, and gives your baby a gift of health, love and security.

Breastmilk is the perfect food for a baby –  Not only is it completely free and always available, it has all of the right ingredients, in just the right amounts. Breastfed babies are sick less often, and suffer from less earaches, allergies, and diarrhea. Breastmilk has even been proven to make the baby’s brain grow!

Breastfeeding is great for mom, too – It burns 500 calories a day! It’s a great way to get back in shape after pregnancy, and also helps prevent your baby from developing childhood obesity.

Did You Know?


Florida 1993 breastfeeding laws clarify that women have a right to breastfeed any place they have a right to be, public or private, even if they don’t do it discretely. (Florida Stature 800.03)

 

 

Do you have questions about Breastfeeding?


Sometimes, moms need help learning to breastfeed or need support.  Early help can turn a challenge into a joy!

Don’t delay calling for help if:

  • Breasts or nipples are sore
  • Nipples are cracked
  • Baby is not latching
  • Milk supply seems low
  • Baby is fussy
  • You think your baby is not getting enough milk
  • You feel like giving up

Pick up the phone and call  – It is worth it to keep breastfeeding your baby as long as you can!


Sarasota Memorial Hospital

Breastfeeding Warm Line:(941) 917-7413
Breastfeeding Classes: (941) 917-1700

La Leche League

Julia Griffith: (941) 918-1767, Christine Holland: (941) 374-3870, Debbie Eldridge: (941) 922-2449, Laura Kati Serbin:  (941) 343-2620, Jessica Adkins: (941) 807-6040, Tanya Taylor: (941) 234-9050 Tiffany Dawson (941) 626-0653 (North Port), Sarah Emprimo-Schwartz (941) 587-9402 (Englewood/North Port) Monthly meetings are held in Sarasota, North Port, and Bradenton.  Call for more information.

Healthy Start Program

Free Services for Breastfeeding Problems: (941) 861-2905

Sarasota County Health Department

WIC and Nutrition Breastfeeding Coordinators:  Aubrey Will (Sarasota) – (941) 861-2960
VENICE: Susan Kling & June Vargas –  (941) 861-3336

Toll-Free Phone Help

Office of Women’s Health BF Help Line
(M-F 9 am-6 pm EST) 1-800-994-9662

African-American Breastfeeding Alliance

(M-F 9 am-5 pm EST) 1-877-532-8535

 

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